Chemical spill possibly to blame for fish kill in Ireland

Chemical

HMN-Investigators believe that a chemical, possibly and herbicide or pesticide, causes the fish kill. (Irish Times)

Following a report by locals to Inland Fisheries Ireland, officers attended a site at Ballinahemery bridge, near Ballymackey, Nenagh, Co Tipperary and confirmed that a large fish kill had occurred on the Ollatrim river, a tributary of the Nenagh river.

In total, 14,749 fish were estimated dead over a 5km stretch of the river. The species affected included brown trout (1,400), lamprey (10,500), stoneloach (805), minnow (1,820), salmon (70), crayfish (70) and stickleback (84).

This is the largest fish kill of lamprey, a protected species, in recent years and it is anticipated that recovery will take several years.

While the investigation is ongoing, the cause appears to have been a chemical agent, possibly herbicide or pesticide, which has now passed through the system.

The public and the farming community are reminded that if using spraying equipment to be aware that herbicide and pesticide chemicals, even when diluted with water, are liable to be extremely toxic to all aquatic species and fish in particular.

Mixing must be done far from natural watercourses, especially in the current conditions when diluting water is in short supply, therefore increasing the toxicity of the chemical.

If mixing chemicals, washing or using spraying equipment for any purpose, particular care must be taken to ensure that the rinsing of equipment does not take place near any water body or watercourse, including small drains.

Coarse angling anniversary match

The National Coarse Fishing Federation of Ireland invites anglers to commemorate 60 years of all-Ireland coarse angling championships with an anniversary match in Co Leitrim this Sunday.

In 1959, the federation was formed by five angling clubs who foresaw the need for governance and a presence on the international match scene. The first championship was held by Ballinamore AC and to celebrate the occasion the federation is taking the championships back to where they started.

Following a report by locals to Inland Fisheries Ireland, officers attended a site at Ballinahemery bridge, near Ballymackey, Nenagh, Co Tipperary and confirmed that a large fish kill had occurred on the Ollatrim river, a tributary of the Nenagh river.

In total, 14,749 fish were estimated dead over a 5km stretch of the river. The species affected included brown trout (1,400), lamprey (10,500), stoneloach (805), minnow (1,820), salmon (70), crayfish (70) and stickleback (84).

This is the largest fish kill of lamprey, a protected species, in recent years and it is anticipated that recovery will take several years.

While the investigation is ongoing, the cause appears to have been a chemical agent, possibly herbicide or pesticide, which has now passed through the system.

The public and the farming community are reminded that if using spraying equipment to be aware that herbicide and pesticide chemicals, even when diluted with water, are liable to be extremely toxic to all aquatic species and fish in particular.

Mixing must be done far from natural watercourses, especially in the current conditions when diluting water is in short supply, therefore increasing the toxicity of the chemical.

If mixing chemicals, washing or using spraying equipment for any purpose, particular care must be taken to ensure that the rinsing of equipment does not take place near any water body or watercourse, including small drains.

Coarse angling anniversary match

The National Coarse Fishing Federation of Ireland invites anglers to commemorate 60 years of all-Ireland coarse angling championships with an anniversary match in Co Leitrim this Sunday.

In 1959, the federation was formed by five angling clubs who foresaw the need for governance and a presence on the international match scene. The first championship was held by Ballinamore AC and to celebrate the occasion the federation is taking the championships back to where they started.

Following a report by locals to Inland Fisheries Ireland, officers attended a site at Ballinahemery bridge, near Ballymackey, Nenagh, Co Tipperary and confirmed that a large fish kill had occurred on the Ollatrim river, a tributary of the Nenagh river.

In total, 14,749 fish were estimated dead over a 5km stretch of the river. The species affected included brown trout (1,400), lamprey (10,500), stoneloach (805), minnow (1,820), salmon (70), crayfish (70) and stickleback (84).

This is the largest fish kill of lamprey, a protected species, in recent years and it is anticipated that recovery will take several years.

While the investigation is ongoing, the cause appears to have been a chemical agent, possibly herbicide or pesticide, which has now passed through the system.

The public and the farming community are reminded that if using spraying equipment to be aware that herbicide and pesticide chemicals, even when diluted with water, are liable to be extremely toxic to all aquatic species and fish in particular.

Mixing must be done far from natural watercourses, especially in the current conditions when diluting water is in short supply, therefore increasing the toxicity of the chemical.

If mixing chemicals, washing or using spraying equipment for any purpose, particular care must be taken to ensure that the rinsing of equipment does not take place near any water body or watercourse, including small drains.

Coarse angling anniversary match

The National Coarse Fishing Federation of Ireland invites anglers to commemorate 60 years of all-Ireland coarse angling championships with an anniversary match in Co Leitrim this Sunday.

In 1959, the federation was formed by five angling clubs who foresaw the need for governance and a presence on the international match scene. The first championship was held by Ballinamore AC and to celebrate the occasion the federation is taking the championships back to where they started.

Increase in Trout angling activity on Corrib

Trout angling activity on Corrib has been rather quiet but with a change in weather conditions there is an increase in activity and some sport to be had on sedges and mayfly.

In the Oughterard area, Liam Butler and Paul Joyce had a day to remember trolling, with Liam landing a super trout of 16.5lb.

Basil Shields of Ardnasillagh Lodge also reported a slight improvement. Tipperary angler John Meagher had eight fish over two days on wet and dry fly, while Bradley Smith from the UK had four for his day, the best 3.5lb.

Frank Costello in Cong – ashfordoldschoolhouse.ie – enjoyed good dry fly and dapping artificial mayflies on Sunday last, landing five with his guests.

 

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