Tech Talk: “Lego Drill”

The Lego Drill

Hazmat Nation has kicked off another “Tech Talk” segment sharing with hazmat teams and responders around the country.  This training tip, the Lego Drill, is from Jason Rogers.

As most training coordinators know, keeping things interesting can be a challenge. Sometimes just keeping the students awake is a challenge. Especially when you mention the dreaded two words “Haz Mat”. That alone can sometimes be a mood killer. So here are a fetech talk lego drillw ideas to keep the guys and gals awake.

This drill is so easy it’s designed for 6-12 year olds or at least that’s what the box says.

Recently we held a week long training evolution that included multiple drills every day. Keeping everyone on task and in a positive learning environment can be a challenge.  Enjoying the drills can be a key to keeping everyone coming back.

This drill we called the “Lego Drill“. First a short trip to the local box store to pick up a you build it type toy. I found myself looking in the toy isle at the Legos. The small sets seemed appropriate so I purchased a jeep, fire boat, and a backhoe. The boxes said for 6-12 year olds so I’m figuring that the average adult could put this together.

We recently purchased some short range headsets that are meant to improve our communications, so it seemed appropriate to use them.

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It was logical to devise the groups into one person with the directions and at least two people deciphering what was supposed to happen. You could use your standard portable radio and work off separate channels. Our plan was to keep it confusing and work on one intercom channel and see what the guys come up with to solve any issues.

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With the standard “on your mark, get set, go!” We started the stopwatch to see just how long it would take. Interested to hear the strategy of all the teams I paid close attention between the directions and what was actually happening at the building tables. Each was unique in tactics with some groups taking turns talking and some ultra competitive teams talking over one another.

It was an enjoyable training drill that could be done with puzzles or just drawing maps using verbal directions. The task of strategic communications can be a challenge. See if your teams innermost child can build the Lego car any faster!

The fastest time was 12 minutes and the longest time was 59 minutes. Which resulted in multiple variations of completed Logo projects.

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This boat took 30 minutes to build during the training drill.

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This jeep was complete injust under 15 minutes.

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2 comments

  1. I do this in my 40 Hr Hazwoper Classes, but I give each team the same Lego kit and in the end they must compare their builds. This helps the instructions team decipher any issues and translate them to the build team – if they can.
    Classes always enjoy this activity.

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